Recession in Japan is fabricated for the country’s brighter future, say economists in a US conference

Japan Economy

BY JON LINDLEY CELESTIAL-AGUSTIN

NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A – In a press conference held earlier with finance experts and analysts around the world, economists bravely pointed out that the recession earlier reported in Japan is “only a fabrication for the country’s brighter future.”

“The reported recession few days ago is merely a fabrication, it’s unreal,” one economist said. “Japan is a country known for having it’s own language and closing its doors from foreigners since time immemorial. Remember the Dutch colonists?”

Early in Japan’s history, the country, under “shogunates” and powerful empires, shut down its doors from foreigners in preparation for a long-term prosperity and wealth.

“Prosperity did happen,” the economist added. “Get back on your history books.”

The 2014 Japanese recession and decade-long debt, the economist further said, are “tests for many wonderful things to come.”

The press conference also noted that Japan has enjoyed economic prosperity, with minor setbacks and depressions, since then. It enjoys its third spot as one of the world’s largest economies, overtaken by the China and United States currently in the highest place.

“A recession in a wealthy Asian nation like Japan is crazy,” he said. “When I heard about it, I giggled. For a nation that has hosted many sporting events such as the Olympics, it’s impossible.”

He strongly said that the Japanese recession reported days back is “just a strategy aimed at controlling demand for Japan’s major plans for the future.”

The country’s major plans include automobiles, technology, food, and hosting various sporting events once again.

“If PM Shinzo Abe will only be honest. Many people are tired of surprises but Japan always loves to create many of these. I suddenly remembered the surprise one gets in a bento box,” he bemused, followed by short laughter from the crowd.

All because of China

The press conference also further said that Japan, along with other nations such as the United States, are working towards chasing the “undeniable prosperity” experienced by China now.

“While China may have outrun other countries in terms of purchasing power,” he said, “it is an economic impulse for other nations to create something out of these demands. That’s what many are doing — trying to keep up with China’s pace.”

Few years ago, analysts have predicted the growing economy of China, and how it could be the world’s largest economy, while journalists have created a negative interpretation of this phenomenon.

“We can’t let this happen, who wants to?” the economist quipped. “We know how China has run their nation and has created social policies that are people-oppressive, for their economic growth. It has to fix its political and social system.”

Russia, Brazil’s meltdown are also unreal

“Like Japan, Brazil and Russia are confident and poised enough to create something out of the growing demand,” he said. “The recession and meltdowns felt in these countries are clearly just masks to hide their beautiful future plans.”

According to many reports, Russia is currently on the verge of an economic meltdown because of the lowering oil prices, that also affects Germany and other European Union nations, having their leaders declare economic slow down, if not recessions.

“Think about this, why do cars slow down? A trip along a higher altitude is one reason,” he said.

He further added that Brazil is nearly impossible to spiral down the line, having hosted billion-dollar-worth of football games and having to host the 2016 Olympics.

“They’ve been unveiling venues, mascots and more,” the economist said. “If they are indeed in a meltdown, why bother to spend more on teasers. And they’re just teasers.”

The press conference, nonetheless, assured the rest of the globe that recessions and lowering of interest rates in banks as “economic boosting strategies” in preparation for the coming years are “impact-less techniques.”

“Others may start thinking of the best stimulus and strategies to further boost economies and create more emerging markets,” the economist said. “But these unreal recessions are just the genius ways.”

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In love from the first bite: When mochi cakes reached Manila

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From afar, they look like cute little hedgehogs stored inside a glass fridge. Passing through the shops, these delicacies are usually caged inside glasses and presented to customers as is — light-colored, small circular cakes lined together in rows.

They are increasingly becoming quite popular nowadays in shopping malls. But unaware passersby, with their presentation, would normally ignore them and get on with their lives. For one, who would spend around PHP 75.00 per small piece of the cakes seeing it so plain on the outside?

But one night, I tried to buy a couple of the cakes that the native Japanese call “mochi cakes.” I have to admit I loved the pastry from the first bite.

Mochi cakes are Japanese rice cakes made from glutinous rice, the same ingredient that makes up a round of tikoy, for the Chinese.

They are among those delicacies that look innocent on the outside, but are unwittingly much tastier on the inside. Mochis are filled with unexpected tastes, that many first-timers would think they are served hot but from the first bite, they are cold heaven.

MOCHI GRAPHIC

Mochi cakes are made of rice on the outside but are filled with different flavors inside. They come in different flavors such as pumpkin, butter, mango, strawberry, and chocolate. There are also other recipes that fill them with apricot, maple and soy beans.

I visited the store called Mochi Cream Cafe in Quezon City to try out how they taste like. This shop and other similar stores have opened branches in many cities around the world including Shanghai, New York, Kuala Lumpur and in Manila.

Like the Chinese tradition of eating rice cakes, mochi cakes are consumed during New Year rituals and ceremonies in Japan. They are also used as toppings for soups during celebrations, as well as ice creams that children enjoy around Japanese villages.

I tried three pieces of mochi cakes on my first visit and ordered a ceremonial matcha tea. The tea went well with the mochis and I got the prepare the ceremonial tea by myself as well.

The ceremonial matcha tea served to me was complete with a ceremonial bowl, not a cup; a bamboo whisk; a bamboo stirrer; and a black heavy tea kettle that is far from the traditional looks of Chinese tea materials.

Matcha, on the other hand, is a tea powder, not leaves, that are often used in rituals and ceremonies performed by Japanese monks.

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The tea became a perfect pair for my mochi cakes that night, with a few spaces between drinking the tea and taking a bite, because of the contrasting temperatures of the hot tea and the cold cakes.

I might have been a little earlier for the Japanese new year but with these mochi cafes hanging just around the corner, we can celebrate the goodness of New Year, all-year round.