Recession in Japan is fabricated for the country’s brighter future, say economists in a US conference

Japan Economy

BY JON LINDLEY CELESTIAL-AGUSTIN

NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A – In a press conference held earlier with finance experts and analysts around the world, economists bravely pointed out that the recession earlier reported in Japan is “only a fabrication for the country’s brighter future.”

“The reported recession few days ago is merely a fabrication, it’s unreal,” one economist said. “Japan is a country known for having it’s own language and closing its doors from foreigners since time immemorial. Remember the Dutch colonists?”

Early in Japan’s history, the country, under “shogunates” and powerful empires, shut down its doors from foreigners in preparation for a long-term prosperity and wealth.

“Prosperity did happen,” the economist added. “Get back on your history books.”

The 2014 Japanese recession and decade-long debt, the economist further said, are “tests for many wonderful things to come.”

The press conference also noted that Japan has enjoyed economic prosperity, with minor setbacks and depressions, since then. It enjoys its third spot as one of the world’s largest economies, overtaken by the China and United States currently in the highest place.

“A recession in a wealthy Asian nation like Japan is crazy,” he said. “When I heard about it, I giggled. For a nation that has hosted many sporting events such as the Olympics, it’s impossible.”

He strongly said that the Japanese recession reported days back is “just a strategy aimed at controlling demand for Japan’s major plans for the future.”

The country’s major plans include automobiles, technology, food, and hosting various sporting events once again.

“If PM Shinzo Abe will only be honest. Many people are tired of surprises but Japan always loves to create many of these. I suddenly remembered the surprise one gets in a bento box,” he bemused, followed by short laughter from the crowd.

All because of China

The press conference also further said that Japan, along with other nations such as the United States, are working towards chasing the “undeniable prosperity” experienced by China now.

“While China may have outrun other countries in terms of purchasing power,” he said, “it is an economic impulse for other nations to create something out of these demands. That’s what many are doing — trying to keep up with China’s pace.”

Few years ago, analysts have predicted the growing economy of China, and how it could be the world’s largest economy, while journalists have created a negative interpretation of this phenomenon.

“We can’t let this happen, who wants to?” the economist quipped. “We know how China has run their nation and has created social policies that are people-oppressive, for their economic growth. It has to fix its political and social system.”

Russia, Brazil’s meltdown are also unreal

“Like Japan, Brazil and Russia are confident and poised enough to create something out of the growing demand,” he said. “The recession and meltdowns felt in these countries are clearly just masks to hide their beautiful future plans.”

According to many reports, Russia is currently on the verge of an economic meltdown because of the lowering oil prices, that also affects Germany and other European Union nations, having their leaders declare economic slow down, if not recessions.

“Think about this, why do cars slow down? A trip along a higher altitude is one reason,” he said.

He further added that Brazil is nearly impossible to spiral down the line, having hosted billion-dollar-worth of football games and having to host the 2016 Olympics.

“They’ve been unveiling venues, mascots and more,” the economist said. “If they are indeed in a meltdown, why bother to spend more on teasers. And they’re just teasers.”

The press conference, nonetheless, assured the rest of the globe that recessions and lowering of interest rates in banks as “economic boosting strategies” in preparation for the coming years are “impact-less techniques.”

“Others may start thinking of the best stimulus and strategies to further boost economies and create more emerging markets,” the economist said. “But these unreal recessions are just the genius ways.”

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